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Honoring Our Heroes: A Veterans Day Tribute

Updated: Nov 16, 2023

This Veterans Day, we find ourselves reflecting on the extraordinary individuals who have served in the armed forces, defending our freedoms and embodying the true spirit of heroism. This year, at BMA, we are humbled and honored to pay tribute to our veterans by sharing their stories and experiences.


We are fortunate to have colleagues who have served, as well as those who have close connections to veterans. Their journeys, sacrifices, and unwavering dedication inspire us daily, and this Veterans Day, we want to amplify their voices and express our deepest appreciation.


These personal accounts are a testament to the diverse backgrounds and experiences within our team, reminding us of the rich tapestry that makes our organization strong. We encourage you to read these stories, reflect on the sacrifices made, and join us in expressing gratitude to all veterans for their selfless service.


To our colleagues who have served and to all veterans around the world, we extend our deepest thanks. Your courage, dedication, and sacrifice have not gone unnoticed, and this Veterans Day, we stand together in honoring your indelible contributions to our nation.




I served 23 years in the US Army and retired in 2012 from Fort Leavenworth, KS. I was an Aviation Officer, flying different helicopters to include the AH-64 Apache and UH-60 Blackhawk helicopters. I had the opportunity to live around the world to include multiple States, South Korea and Germany.


Given what you know now, what advice would you give yourself at the start of your career?

Appreciate and cherish everyday, no matter the circumstances; because your time in the service is over before you know it.


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I joined the Illinois Army National Guard in September of 2000 as an Infantryman, at the start of my senior year in high school. I had a year to learn as much as I could before shipping off to Ft. Benning, GA in Aug of 2001. We officially started our training on 11 Sep. 2001. Immediately after basic, I was stationed in Darmstadt, Germany with 1-178 INF, 35TH ID, for one year. After returning home I signed up to deploy with a transportation unit only to be stood down after 4 months. Later that year I would be part of the first US mission to train with the Polish military. In 2004, The 35th ID was sent to Ft. Polk, LA where we would fall under the 509th and play as OPFOR in “The Box,’ training over ten thousand soldiers. In 2006 I reclassed and attended the Army’s Intelligence Analyst course at Ft, Huachuca. In 2007, I attended another mission to Poland, serving as the 35th’s Intel representative. In 2008, I deployed with the 37th INF DIV to Kuwait. I was attached to the 3rd Army Intel section where I served as an Intelligence NCO. I also tasked by my unit to go on escort missions to Iraq and Afghanistan. In 2010 I volunteered to deploy again with the 1-174 ADA out of Cincinnati, Ohio where I would serve as a C-RAM specialist, Intel NCO and Battle NCO, tracking and conducting analysis on over 1,400 rocket attacks throughout Iraq. I joined the Missouri National Guard in 2013 where I am currently serving and undergoing a MEDBOARD.


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I served 30 years in the Army as an Armor officer including numerous overseas assignments including Operation Desert Storm in 1990-1991 and Operation Iraqi Freedom 2004-2005.


Can you share a memorable or impactful moment from your military service that has stayed with you and continues to inspire you today?

Serving alongside countless dedicated and brave soldiers over the years served as an inspiration to me.








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I joined the New York City National Guard June 1975. Graduated from the Women’s Army Corps basic training February 1976. A year later transferred to Regular Army Active duty in the Signal Corps. Served as an enlisted Soldier for eight years. Served as a Drill Instructor.

In 1985 was commission to be a commissioned officer. Served in the Signal Corps. Held several key staff positions: Platoon Leader, Company Commander, Battalion Signal Officer (S6), Battalion Operational Officer and Battalion Personnel Officer (S1).

Retired February 1997 from the U.S Army with twenty-years of honorable service. From retirement on I continued to support the Soldiers on Fort Cavazos as a contractor in various positions.


What motivated you to join the military, and how has that experience influenced your career in the civilian world?

The military gave me opportunity to become self-sufficient, obtain a college degree, travel and be a part of a big family. Twenty years in the Signal Corps experiences in different tactical systems that can apply in teaching.


Given what you know now, what advice would you give yourself at the start of your career?

Be all you can be! Always give 100% no matter what you do.That was my motto when I started my military career and still is my motto today.


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I served 25 years in the Army as a 19k M1A1 Armor Crewmen. My grandfather served in Korea and my father in Vietnam. My oldest son currently serves in the Marines. It is just something that I wanted to do in the beginning and it turned into a career. I had a few deployments and had the privilege to serve alongside some of the best people I have ever met. Just knowing that everyday you put on the uniform you are representing something bigger than yourself. You have purpose everyday. It's not for everyone, many have tried it and failed at it and just quit. So for those of us that did it, we are just a different breed. It's a family and lifelong bond. I would do it all over again , but it goes by so fast. It was an honor to have served.


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I entered college at 16 in 1974 during the final months of the Vietnam War. Reserve Officer’s Training Corps (ROTC) made great sense to me with the ongoing draft and conflict. Despite the protests and broad national sentiments in some cities, I was raised a patriot; the son of a veteran and all of my uncles were veterans. Service was a natural a path as any at the time. Plus, I competed for and won a two-year ROTC scholarship that paid my tuition and books plus a modest stipend. Without these, my college degree would have been much more difficult. I met my wife in college where we both worked as ROTC recruiters.


Is there anything else you'd like to add or any advice you have for people who may not fully understand the significance of Veterans Day?

Compared to most of the world, Americans live in a docile setting with the expectation that our military will always “do the right thing.” Most citizens of the rest of the world fear and loathe their uniformed military as an unpredictable, undisciplined element to be avoided at all costs. America’s citizen military focused on preservation of the Republic through defense of the Constitution continues to live up to the high expectations of our citizens. By reverencing past service and selfless sacrifice , we set a laudable foundation for future service.

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Can you share a bit about your military background and experience, including your branch of service and the roles you held during your service? I enlisted in the Army on 18 June 1978 and retired in JUN 2002. I went through Basic Training at FT Dix and it changed me. I went to the United States Military Academy Prep School (USMAPS) and got an appointment to West Point. I graduated, and was commissioned in the Field Artillery in May 1983. I served most of my career in rapid deployment units (3ID (M), 7 ID(L), and 82 ABN), and blew up a lot of stuff. I’m good at it. I had two commands and served my last tour at USMAPS as the guy in charge of all of the Cadets Candidates. Yes, as former inmate and paid hypocrite. I am also a graduate of the US Army Ranger school (1984), Airborne School (1981) and 82nd ABN Jumpmaster School (1997).

Can you share a memorable or impactful moment from your military service that has stayed with you and continues to inspire you today? In the Army, we used to say “take care of your soldiers” but not many people could define what that meant. In command, I learned that it meant “setting your soldiers up for success” even at your own expense. That lesson remains with me. For example, I worked with West Point Field Force after retiring to help kids get into West Point and the other academies. It takes a lot of your free time. Helping a kid get one step closer to a dream of attending an academy is a big deal. One day, they will lead the America’s most precious resource.… the sons and daughters of this great nation.

Is there anything else you'd like to add or any advice you have for people who may not fully understand the significance of Veterans Day? When I retired, I was still wrapped pretty tight so adjusting to the civilian world was pretty tough for me as a disabled veteran. Please remember, adjusting to civilian life is not always easy for veterans. Sometimes we are little rough around the edges, broken, or hard of hearing. Veteran’s Day is the day to think about those who have served and the price they may have paid.

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Sean Jeffers, Fort Cavazos RSTS - Instructor

Can you share a bit about your military background and experience, including your branch of service and the roles you held during your service? Served as both an Infantryman and signaleer in the US Army. Filled multiple roles from gun team leader to spectrum and COMSEC manager to instructor.

What motivated you to join the military, and how has that experience influenced your career in the civilian world? Biggest motivation was the 9/11 attacks, I joined up right after. That event helped to focus my attentions in the civilian world to doing whatever we can to ensure our safety and defense, both militarily and through the civilian sector.


Given what you know now, what advice would you give yourself at the start of your career?

Always take a step back and try to breath. Think about the larger picture and always put things into perspective. It's easy to get lost in the details.

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